That'll Do Piggly

Elmer T. Lee Commemorative Edition Bourbon

thecasks:

Press Release

BUFFALO TRACE DISTILLERY RELEASES ELMER T. LEE COMMEMORATIVE EDITION BOURBON

Profits from Limited Edition Bourbon going to local VFW

FRANKFORT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, KY (April. 3, 2014) – In 1949, a slight young man fresh out of college with an engineering degree came to…

Me wantee

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(Source: leafmotif, via geekexchangemagazine)

brokeandbespoke:

A More Affordable Alternative to the Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope has Arrived

One of my all time favorite watches is the Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope pictured in the lower picture above. It is a Bauhaus classic, German-made, and will set you back about $1800 for a new one. 

I’m not likely to buy a watch at that price point, but another German watch company, Junkers, has recently released a watch that clearly takes its design cue from the Max Bill. To call it derivative would be an understatement, an homage, perhaps more appropriate.

The Junkers ‘Bauhaus’ model comes with a solid and dependable Japanese-made Miyota (part of the Citizen watch group) movement, and the extra dials you see do not serve the chronograph functions as they do on the Junghans Bill Max Chronoscope. Instead, the top dial is a power reserve indicator, which tells you how much power the automatic watch has before it needs to be worn or put on a winder—from the enumeration on this sub-dial, it looks like the Bauhaus has a power reserve of about 40 hours.

The bottom dial is a 24-hr dial, so that you can determine military time without having to do calculations in your head. I do not believe it is independently moveable from the regular hour and minute hands, and so cannot be set to a separate time zone, and so this is not a GMT watch (which would have been cool). It’s mostly there for looks, and to give the Bauhaus the same dial layout as the Max Bill Chronoscope.

To be honest, I’ve owned both automatic chronographs and power reserve watches, and for my purposes always found the power reserve a more helpful feature. But I never really have a need for a stopwatch, that may not be the case for you. In any event, the best part about the Junkers Bauhaus is that its price tag, which, while still not cheap, comes in at less than 1/3 that of the Junghans.

So for about $550 you can own a watch that has the styling of the Junghans Bill Max Chronoscope, is not a black market replica, has a dependable Miyota movement, and has genuine functionality in its visible power reserve and 24-hr sub-dials. Not bad.

Also, if you do a search, you can find Junkers’ version of the plain dialed Max Bill Junghans with date aperture. The Junghans costs about $1000, and the Junkers (which comes not with a Japanese Miyota movement, but the Swiss workhorse ETA 2824-2) costs $550.

*Pictures not my own. The Junkers was reblogged by abitofcolor and showed up on my dash this morning, inspiring this post, and the Junghans was found via a google image search which led me to a site where the original photographer was not credited…